Kacy & Clayton, Eric McEntee, Jeremy Ferrara

Kacy & Clayton

Eric McEntee

Jeremy Ferrara

Wed, February 22, 2017

8:00 pm

$10 in Advance // $12 at the Door

This event is 21 and over

Kacy & Clayton
Kacy & Clayton
The music of Kacy and Clayton exists outside of time, and burgeons with beautiful contradictions. It’s psychedelic and traditional, contemporary and vintage, melancholic and joyous. All at once, it showcases a slightly psych-folk sound of Linda Perhacs, Fleet Foxes, and First Aid Kit; rare country blues records and English folk tunes; and 1920s disaster songs and murder ballads. Their songs often are sugar-coated pills, tales of murderous jealousy, dilapidated graveyards, and infanticide, all delivered with Kacy Anderson’s sweet, lithe voice, and Clayton Linthicum’s hypnotic fingerpicking.

Their latest album, Strange Country, strays away from straightforward folk, delivering a sound that pairs Laurel Canyon vibes with Dustbowl-era drama. And for the duo, the subject matter is literally close to home. They’re second cousins who have grown up in the Wood Mountain Uplands, an isolated region of southern Saskatchewan. It is ranch country, very remote, with a landscape punctuated with hills, 12 miles from the Montana border. Neighbors were scarce, and their school bus ride was a long drive into town. “Where we come from it’s kind of a step behind society,” Kacy, 19, says, “We had a lot of time to take in our surroundings. Characters are still very strong.”

They learned music by picking up rare vinyl at record stores — the closest, the 21-year-old Clayton says, was five hours away — and Kacy troweled through Wikipedia to discover long-forgotten bands and musicians. But even Internet was unreliable in their area. The remoteness of their town required many hours in the car, so the long trips became educational moments. “I found out about Doc Watson and The Carter Family from a tape that my grandpa had in his car,” Clayton says, “and I found out about Hank Snow and Bob Wills from a neighbor who came up on 1940s and ‘50s country music.”

Clayton would experiment with instruments scattered in his great-uncle Carl’s basement, occasionally performing with Kacy and her sisters (Carl’s grandchildren). There wasn’t much of a conventional music scene where they lived. However, Kacy & Clayton spent most of their Sunday evenings at the seniors home performing with and for local geriatrics. To rehearse, the two cousins living six miles apart often illegally drove to each other’s houses before they had driver’s licenses.
Eric McEntee
Eric McEntee
"The work of L.A. songwriter Eric J. McEntee stokes the fires kindled by ’70s folk and pop song artists whose lush, clarion songs are easy on the ears, if hard on the heart."
- Buzzbands.la http://buzzbands.la/2011/06/17/ears-wide-open-hand/

Months spent on a bridge busking in Paris has proved to Eric McEntee that there are still ways in 2017 that writing and performing songs can be timeless. In approach and sound, McEntee is direct link to what he listens to most: The 1960's Greenwich Village Songwriter Milieu and countless other songwriters he discovered along the way that seemed to have been forgotten by history: Bread, Love and Dreams, Rodriguez, Val Stoecklein, John Stewart to name a few, all of whom McEntee carries on in song.

Like a musical time-lapse, he recorded something almost forgotten of his own (or as of yet widely unheard) in his previous two self-released EP's (Forthcoming LP in 2017); those who heard them were often stunned by the clarity of production and the songwriting form which seemed to be held some 50 years away... Time changes everything, but McEntee still holds to a simple practice where the only thing that matters is the song. The process of songwriting seems perfectly analogous to discuss the mysteries, discoveries and nature at work in both life and music for him, as they slowly fade into unison. He's currently based in California.
Jeremy Ferrara
Jeremy Ferrara
Jeremy Ferrara is a folk singer and guitarist from San Francisco, California. Amidst introspective lyrics and guitar playing full of subtlety, his songs are laced with vulnerability and a style that doesn’t hold back. Having played in bands since he was 12 years old, Jeremy found his voice as a solo artist in the DIY scene of Santa Barbara.

His recently released EP “A Part” was recorded during the summer of 2016 in Berlin, Germany, where he learned the joys and sorrows of being a full time busker. Currently, you can find Jeremy singing in the streets, cafes, and bars of San Francisco.
Venue Information:
Hotel Utah
500 4th Street
San Francisco, CA, 94107
http://www.hotelutah.com/